Category Archives: Don Nelson

Small and Smaller: Rockets 111 Warriors 109

Just as in the last game, the Warriors came out in the third quarter firing on all cylinders.  The Rockets, perhaps road weary on the back-to-back, were a step slower than in the first half.  The Warriors went on a 15-4 run to turn a 7 point half-time deficit into a 4 point lead, and looked like they were on their way.

Then, towards the end of the third quarter, Rick Adelman went small.  Out came Scola and Hayes.  In came Landry and Lowry.  The Rockets went 6-8″ across the front line, and had two 6-0″ point guards in the backcourt.

Continue reading

Crazy Nellie: The Randolph Conundrum

“…a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.”            — Winston Churchill

Now that Jackson is gone, and the Ellis/Curry backcourt is no longer as controversial as it was, the Bay Area media have picked up a new hammer to beat Don Nelson over the head with: the playing time of the Warriors tantalizingly gifted young big man, Anthony Randolph.  After witnessing last night’s game, overhearing an interesting comment by Coach Keith Smart, and coming across an article on the Suns’ tantalizingly gifted young big man, Earl Clark,  I feel ready to drop my thoughts on this matter:

Continue reading

Six is Enough: Warriors 111 Mavericks 103

That gasp I heard as the Warriors seized control in the fourth quarter, was that the Mavs fans?  Was it Mavs owner/GM Mark Cuban once again suffering a melted brain?  Or was it the sound of The Warriors Bet coming off life-support?

Continue reading

Hobbled, Winged, Clipped: Clippers 118 Warriors 90

There’s not much to say about this game, which means the anti-Nelson wolfpack, led by Kawakami, Lauridsen and Lepper will have a whole lot to talk about.  Or should I say howl about.

Don’t be fooled.  The Warriors had no chance to win this game.  Ever.  Starting from the moment that Biedrins was declared unavailable.  With no Biedrins and no Turiaf, the Warriors had no way to match up with this very underrated Clippers team.

Here’s why, in a nutshell:

Continue reading

Pre-Game Jitters

Will Don Nelson really start Stephen Jackson against Marcus Camby?  The 6-11″ Camby has been the Clippers’ starting power forward in the absence of Blake Griffin.  He doesn’t resemble Zach Randolph in any shape or form.  If Nellie does go with Jack at the 4, it will be a classic case of “Who will flinch first.”  The Clippers will presumably try to take advantage of the matchup, but it should be noted that Camby is not a post player.  He likes to drift around the elbows.  And Kaman will be clogging the post area.  The Warriors, of course, will be trying to run this big Clippers lineup off the court.  They better hope they hit some shots. They won’t be getting any rebounds.

Continue reading

Feltbot’s Prescription

Through the first two games, the Warriors have looked pretty crappy.  I’m not going to rehash everything I’ve already posted about that.  Here’s Private Jackson with a pithy summation: “I just think, like Coach said earlier, the first two games, we look like a team (on which) everyone’s playing for a contract and we’re not playing like a team. That’s all I can see.”

You can apply this statement to everyone on the team, if you like.  “Everyone must look at himself in the mirror,” and so on.  Certainly Corey Maggette has had a couple of stinkers.  But the Warriors don’t look to CM to do anything on the offensive end but score.  That’s his role.  To me, Jackson’s statement rests squarely on the shoulders of Monta Ellis.  He’s the player who’s had the ball in his hands the most often.  He’s the player who has taken the most shots.  He’s the player who has done an absolutely terrible job creating for his teammates.  He barely even looks at them.  And he’s the player who, when Curry has left the game and he has had sole responsibility at the point, has been leading the team over a cliff.  Monta Ellis is the biggest culprit for the Warriors’ obvious lack of chemistry.

What can Don Nelson do about this?  After some thought, I have decided that the solution lies in the lineups.  Nellie has a lot of pieces on this team, and he has been doing a lot of experimenting with how they should fit together.  I don’t think he’s found the right lineups yet.  My simple prescription for fixing the Warriors’ chemistry is this:

Continue reading

The Warriors Bet

OK, so we have Stephen Jackson trying to force a trade, a  disgruntled Monta Ellis even more disgruntled by the drafting of new kid on the block Stephen Curry, Brandon Wright out for the season, again, with a dismembered wing, news that Rony Turiaf is playing with a torn cartilage, and our lone remaining power forward on the roster, 225 lb. stringbean Anthony Randolph, already pulverized to a pulp and doubtful for the season opener.  According to rumor, our starting point guard is a rookie, and our starting power forward is a 6-6″ small forward.  Am I leaving anything out?

Oh yes: we have a snarling pack of Bay Area sportswriters circling Don Nelson like arctic wolves around a wounded bull moose, hoping for a big kill to swell their circulations.

Could this possibly be the time to consider betting on the Warriors?               Continue reading

Warriors 126 New Orleans 92

“In small proportions we just beauties see….”    — Ben Jonson

I listened to this game on the radio.  Thank God we’re done with basketball that isn’t televised.  Let’s get this party started!

Common sense tells us there is nothing to take away from this last preseason game.  New Orleans clearly wasn’t in the mood to have fun:  they left Chris Paul, David West, Emeka Okafor and Julian Wright on the bench.  The Warriors went without four of their starters as well, but for more lugubrious reasons.  Biedrins was being rested, but Randolph, Azubuike and Jackson were out with injuries.

I have never been overly afflicted with common sense, though. Continue reading

Pre-game Links

Stephen Jackson talks.  Again.  Nothing new, except a futher indication that Jackson is resigning himself to remaining a Warrior for this year, or as long as it takes to find a trade.  Continue reading

Private Jackson

Trying to parse Jackson’s words is a mistake.  It is a trivial exercise to find all the contradictions, frequently within the same sentence.  Nothing that’s coming out of his mouth makes sense, except the generality that he’s trying to communicate:  he feels betrayed, and he wants no connection to the team.     Continue reading