Category Archives: Recaps

Merry Christmas: Lakers 115 Warriors 105

The Lakers got the best Christmas present they could possibly wish for in this game against the Warriors: the absence of Kobe Bryant. Could there be any more stark indication of what a bad player Kobe is now? Utterly inefficient. Utterly selfish. A willful and unrepentant destroyer of his team’s offensive chemistry. An indifferent destroyer of his team’s defense (he hasn’t competed on that end in years). It was fascinating to watch the Lakers play like a team on both ends, and I for one was amazed at how the worst defensive team in the league could look for one night like one of the best. Maybe they are one of the best, with Ed Davis in for Boozer, and Wayne Ellington in for Kobe? Wesley Johnson is no slouch — ask Harrison Barnes. Continue reading

Odor City: Warriors 104 Pistons 93

“Who am I?”     — Jason Bourne

Only reason I’m choosing to recap this game, or indeed this road trip, is that it’s been awhile, and I have some free time. The Warriors weren’t really tested on this trip, against some truly godawful teams. I don’t think it’s even possible for the bottom of the East to be worse than it is this season. Continue reading

Keith Smart Lives: Warriors 91 Thunder 86

I always used to say that losing Andrew Bogut’s services made Mark Jackson a better coach. With Steve Kerr, however, the opposite appears to be true. If you ask me, Kerr almost got the Warriors beat in a game they should have controlled.     Continue reading

Clobbered City: Warriors 121 Clippers 104

I thought before last season started that the Warriors were already a better team than the Clippers. All of the reasons I gave then still apply, but particularly the fact that the Clippers are terribly weak defensively on the wings. JJ Redick and Jamal Crawford — among the league’s worst. Matt Barnes appears to have fallen off the face of the earth. If the Clips don’t fix this situation, they’re in for a disappointing season.  Continue reading

Game 3 — Clippers 98 Warriors 96: The Adjustments

Were you among the many who concluded on the basis of game 2 that the Warriors had no shot against the Clippers in this series? Well, this game must have come as a surprise.           Continue reading

Game 1 — Warriors 109 Clippers 105: Lee Owns Griffin

I just woke up from a really cool dream. The Warriors were playing the Clippers, and they were running pick and roll the whole game. And the Clippers were blitzing Curry every time, and Curry did a great job drawing the blitz out and then hitting his big man wide open in the key, but weirdly, his big man wasn’t Bogut, it was David Lee, and Lee didn’t just stand there after he caught it, looking around for someone else to pass to, or waiting to hand it back off to Curry, no, Lee rumbled straight to the basket, and either finished the play himself, or passed it to a wide-open teammate for a dunk, and the Clippers were falling all over themselves trying to guard this unguardable pick and roll, this gorgeous sublimation of the art of basketball, and the Clippers were fouling out, and pointing fingers, and Doc Rivers was furiously calling timeouts, and…

Hey, wait… What?     Continue reading

Warriors 122 Mavs 120: Splash

Huge win for the Warriors in what can aptly be described as the first playoff game of the season. Both teams desperately needed this game.

The game was so big, that Mark Jackson actually let the Warriors play. He is, in general, a much better coach when his big man options are limited. But he’s also to be credited for limiting the isolation offense in this game, and trusting his great passing team to create.

One big only, Draymond Green at the four.

Early offense.

Limited isolations.

Pick and roll after pick and roll after pick and roll. Relentless, all game long. (Wouldn’t it be nice to see this with David Lee playing?)

Scoring centers, busting the Curry blitz.

Jordan Crawford, taking over the second unit offense.

My version of the Warriors true identity.          Continue reading

Warriors 113 Blazers 112: Nellieball in the Nick of Time

It will go completely unreported by the mainstream press, but it was Mark Jackson’s opening defensive game plan that nearly sunk the Warriors against the Blazers in this game.         Continue reading

Clippers 111 Warriors 98: Dead Horses

I’m not going to harp too much on the outcome of this game, because as the game wore on, it became apparent that the Warriors didn’t have the horses to go the distance. Actually, it was apparent as early as the first quarter, when Mark Jackson pulled Stephen Curry at 4:14. No way he does that if Curry’s 100% — he’s been playing the entire first quarter this season. And as even 5 yr. old Warriors fans know — better than anyone, in fact — no Stephen Curry, no win.    Continue reading

Warriors 98 Pacers 96: Thompson Arrives

I snarked pre-game on Twitter that the Warriors were finally playing a team that Mark Jackson knew how to match up against. I was referring of course, to Jackson’s penchant for playing big in crunchtime. And for using Andrew Bogut to close games. Even in the most obviously wrong situations, as against Toronto’s closing smallball frontline of Amir Johnson and Patrick Patterson. Jackson literally gave that game away.     Continue reading