Tag Archives: Andre Iguodala

Solving Lacob’s Cube

The amateur GM of the Warriors has given his rookie coaches a lot of difficult puzzles to solve over the years. Veritable Rubik’s Cube rosters of mismatched pieces, that Keith Smart and Mark Jackson struggled to color coordinate. One-way defensive centers who were poor offensive partners for one of the most talented pick and roll point guards to ever play (The Kwame Brown Era, Bogut, Ezeli). Backup power forwards who weren’t power forwards (Lou Amundson, Jeremy Tyler, Jermaine O’Neal, Mo Speights). Defensive wings who couldn’t shoot the three (Dominic McGuire, the rookie Green), or actually defend (the rookie Barnes). Backup point guards who couldn’t shoot the three (the rookie Jeremy Lin, Ish Smith, Acie Law, Charles Jenkins, and yes, Shaun Livingston), or run the team (Charles Jenkins, Nate Robinson, Tony Douglas, Kent Bazemore, Jordan Crawford), or both.           Continue reading

Requiem for a Season: Clippers 126 Warriors 121 — Game 7

I would have  loved to have watched this game at home, and to have it on tape. Instead, due to the dark alchemies of pipes, drywall, microbes and time, I was once again forced to watch from a sportsbar — the Fiddler’s Green in San Rafael, with their fine selection of Belgian beers and Irish whiskeys.     Continue reading

Game 4 — Warriors 118 Clippers 97: The Sins of the Past

I hate that I have to lead with Donald Sterling’s idiocy after a game like this one. Hate that it’s the major storyline describing the Clipper’s failure to win this game.  Continue reading

Warriors 122 Mavs 120: Splash

Huge win for the Warriors in what can aptly be described as the first playoff game of the season. Both teams desperately needed this game.

The game was so big, that Mark Jackson actually let the Warriors play. He is, in general, a much better coach when his big man options are limited. But he’s also to be credited for limiting the isolation offense in this game, and trusting his great passing team to create.

One big only, Draymond Green at the four.

Early offense.

Limited isolations.

Pick and roll after pick and roll after pick and roll. Relentless, all game long. (Wouldn’t it be nice to see this with David Lee playing?)

Scoring centers, busting the Curry blitz.

Jordan Crawford, taking over the second unit offense.

My version of the Warriors true identity.          Continue reading

Warriors 93 Nets 86: Nellieball Haiku

The floor is spread, the offense flows.

The extra wing, the defense swarms.

Nellieball.

Continue reading

Warriors 102 Rockets 99: Increasingly Isolated

Anyone satisfied with this win? I don’t like to quibble with wins generally, but the noise surrounding this one was pretty loud. Steve Kerr and Chris Webber absolutely killed Mark Jackson’s stagnant iso-heavy offense in their TNT commentary last night. And that was nothing compared to what I saw on Twitter from the Warriors media.             Continue reading

Warriors 102 Bulls 87: The Shadow Warriors

We got a look at the Shadow Warriors in this victory over the Bulls. By which I mean the seldom-seen lineup combinations within this Warriors roster, the true full squad within the #fullsquad, that GM Joe Lacob, Spokesmodel Bob Myers, and interim coach Mark Jackson would strongly prefer to keep hidden from view.

I’m referring of course to the one big + four smalls, and even five smalls units that worked to perfection last night in blowing out a bigger, rougher and tougher Chicago Bulls team. I’m referring to the gloriously talented Nellieball units contained within this extraordinarily versatile Warriors roster, that have the power to transform this Warriors team from pretender to contender. Continue reading

Pacers 102 Warriors 94: Two Players Away

“We’re right there.” — Stephen Curry

I don’t buy the media narrative that the Indiana Pacers are on another level than the Golden State Warriors. While other writers saw nothing but how far away the Warriors are from the 33-7 Pacers, what I noticed was just how close the Warriors are to beating this team with a stick.

In my mind, the Warriors are merely two players away.

Andre Iguodala and Jordan Crawford.    Continue reading

Nellieball Vanquishes Champions: Warriors 123 Heat 114

The Warriors gave up 114 points to the Heat on this night.

And won by 9.

In Miami. Becoming the only Western Conference team to beat the World Champions in their home crib since… the Warriors did it last year, playing exactly the same way.

Playing The Right Way, for this most gloriously gifted offensive team in the NBA.

Playing Nellieball.

I’m not going to recap this game, because as everyone who reads this blog knows, I have been recapping it for four long years. In my mind, and on the pages of this blog, trying my best to explain to others the players that Stephen Curry and David Lee could become, together, if surrounded with the right pieces, the right coach, and if played in the right system.

Championship Caliber Players.

Tonight, after three long years, you finally saw it not in my words, but in action on the court. I’ll leave it to my faithful readers to fill in the details.

After I get one more thing off my chest:

Joe Lacob, the time for cheapness and running the Warriors like a business is over. This Warriors team stands on the cusp of greatness. The Championship of the NBA is up for grabs this season, and this Warriors team has it in their sights. It is beyond time for you to open the purse strings and get them the help they need. For long-suffering Warriors’ fans sake, for the sake of one of the most gloriously talented cores in NBA history, for the sake of basketball history itself,

GET STEPHEN CURRY A BACKUP.

Warriors 115 Suns 86: A Dish Served Cold

Revenge played a big part in this turnaround Warriors effort against the Suns. Home cooking certainly played a role.

And Mark Jackson deserves a lot of credit. He committed to running Channing Frye off the three point line. He had the Warriors offense spacing the floor much better, and executing far more crisply. And running the ball back at the Suns. Great tempo in this game.

But I think the biggest difference between this game and the game in Phoenix was the ability to put Andre Iguodala on Eric Bledsoe. Iggy is still nothing like himself, one glance at the box score will tell you that. But Bledsoe was nothing like himself either with Iggy guarding him, and that’s all she wrote.

Games like this get me thinking like I was thinking to start the season.

Thinking that the Warriors have the best starting five in the NBA.  Continue reading