Tag Archives: Andris Biedrins

Opening Salvo: Golden State Warriors 132 Houston Rockets 128

I am a firm believer that there is nothing wrong with an ugly win.  That belief was tested a bit in this game, in which I was unable to discern many signs of cohesive team play on either side of the ball.  In my eyes, this game was won by the extraordinary individual efforts of a few very talented Warriors players.  I think you know who.  But it was a win.

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First Look: LA Lakers 105 Golden State Warriors 102

“You are doing the defense a favor when you post up Lee or Biedrins.” —  Mark Jackson

I couldn’t agree with Mark Jackson more.  We were told by the commentators to last night’s game that Keith Smart and his staff were raving about David Lee’s “surprising” abilities in the low post. (Surprising to whom?  Matt Steinmetz et al? They weren’t surprising to feltbot.)  Jackson went on to explain that despite Lee’s talent in the post, he is one of the greatest pick and roll players in the league, and that is how the Warriors should deploy him. I couldn’t agree more, as readers of this blog know.

And yet last night we were treated by Keith Smart to four quarters of watching the Warriors trying to post up Lee and Biedrins in the heart of the Lakers defense.  Why?  For well over three quarters, Smart ran literally no pick and rolls with Lee that were designed to get him a shot.  Instead Andris Biedrins was used almost exclusively to set the high picks, with Lee standing uselessly on the wings waiting for the ball that never came. Why?

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Sleep Well, My Friends: More Fantasy Basketball Sleepers

Winning in fantasy basketball is not just a matter of lucking into one of the top two picks in the draft, although that certainly helps.  And its not just a matter of sticking to the discipline of the published draft rankings, rather than drafting your favorite players, although that certainly helps too.  A large part of winning fantasy leagues involves doing your own scouting and independent thinking to find value where no one else — not even the fantasy experts — expect to find it. In other words, it involves finding and scooping up “sleepers” — players that for different reasons are greatly undervalued heading into the season.

As I prepared for my second and final expert league fantasy basketball draft to be held later today, I realized that I had in mind a whole list of sleeper candidates that fantasy basketball enthusiasts might be interested in reading about.  So, at the risk of boring the pants off my regular readership, here it is:

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How Do I Love Lee?

Let me count the ways. — E. B. Browning

Don Nelson, Larry Riley and the Golden State Warriors have just pulled off a trade for an all-star power forward, a trade that will define the next era of Warriors’ basketball.  And in the fashion typical of our wonderful Bay Area media, it was greeted by yawns and derision.  Some of these esteemed commentators, and their bellowing herds of followers, even arrived at the conclusion that the Warriors LOST this trade.  In their minds, because it was executed by the “old regime,” without the approval of the new owners, then it can’t be good.  And because Anthony Randolph is merely 21, while David Lee is all of 27, then Randolph automatically has a bigger upside than the all-star Lee.

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Some Random Thoughts

Anthony Morrow:  Before you get too excited about Morrow’s lights-out shooting in the Hornets game, take a look at what Stojakovich, Mo Pete and Marcus Thornton did against him.  The Warriors were fortunate that the Hornets gave Posey as many minutes as they did, so that he had a stiff to guard for 20 minutes.

How do you know that you are not an NBA defender?  When you get assigned the stiff, and the random D-league call-up gets assigned the tough cover.

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Vacation Thread and Mavs Bet Update

Yes, just as things are once again getting heated in Warriors land with Biedrins-gate, feltbot is off to the Mexican riviera for a much needed stint of Warriors rehab.  I’ll be gone 10 days, missing the next 6 games, including the brutal 4 road games in 5 nights stretch next week.  It’s probably just as well. My Lagavulin bill has been killing me.

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Curry to Watson: Warriors 108 Hawks 104

“Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in.”  –  Silvio Dante, quoting Michael Corleone.

At 6:05 of the fourth quarter, Stephen Curry received the ball under his own basket, looked up court and threw a 70 foot chest pass that hit a double-covered CJ Watson in the hands for a layup.  This sensational play capped a 16-0 Warriors run that tied the game at 95, and sent the Oracle into delirium. And thanks to the good folks at Golden State of Mind, the Thaiblonde and I were right in the midst of the madness.  We were eight rows back behind the backboard jumping up in joyous disbelief as Watson caught the ball over his shoulder and layed in the reverse.

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Things to Chew On: Warriors 132 Clippers 102

1) Let’s get the obvious out of the way first: the Clippers showed up to this game already on vacation.  In other words, they didn’t show up.

2) I was a huge fan of Baron Davis when he was with the Warriors.

3) I am SO happy now that the Warriors did not re-sign him.  His game was heavily dependent on athleticism, and his athleticism is gone. His legs are shot. He is a shadow of himself.

4) How good is Stephen Curry?  I will avoid maudlin gushing and simply repeat what I have been saying since the start of the season: Better than Steve Nash was in his third NBA season.           Continue reading

Pre-Game Jitters: Mavs

In their last game, horrible as it was, the Warriors showed a few positive developments.  Morrow came off the injured list.  Curry came off the respirator. Tolliver got an NBA contract and responded by looking like an NBA power forward.  Biedrins had his best game of the season.

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Lone Star: Mavericks 110 Warriors 101

The Warriors lost their seventh game in a row last night, and are currently the third worst team in the league, by record.  It is easy to get down as a Warriors fan watching this season play out, particularly when the Warriors don’t give much of an effort, as we saw in the Houston game.  In this game, however, with the return from injury of Corey Maggette, and the return to dominance of Monta Ellis, we saw the return of the heart and effort that has characterized the Warriors’ play in this most tragic and difficult of seasons.  As a fan, I can derive enjoyment from that, even if the result is a loss.         Continue reading