Tag Archives: Brandan Wright

No Style for Young Men: Nets 94 Warriors 90

You’re exactly right, dear reader, there is simply no way that this Nets team, featuring the Lopezasaurus, Sasha Vujacic and Anthony Morrow should have been able to hold the Warriors to 90 points. Don Nelson would have put up 120 points against this slow as molasses and completely out-classed lineup with his eyes half shut.                                                                           Continue reading

The Favorites: Warriors 107 Utah 100

Last night’s Warriors win over the Jazz has had me at a loss for words for nearly a day. How to characterize this win?  It was an ugly win, to be sure.  Curry had one of the worst games of his career.  David Lee was lackluster, on the back-to-back. Vlad Rad was horrid. Udoh was OK, but gassed on his first road back-to-back at altitude.  Several non-shooters were brought off the bench, which for long stretches made the Warriors offense look like it was running in mud. Only great shooting nights from Dorell Wright and Reggie Williams, and a legitimate superstar performance from Monta Ellis kept the Warriors in this game, and ultimately got them over the hump. Continue reading

The Closer: Warriors 110 Pacers 108

Monta Ellis rewrote the title of this Warriors-Pacers recap for me. I had several titles in the works. “Outpaced” was one, jotted down when the Pacers were running away with the tempo and the game in the second quarter. Others had to do with how badly Dorell Wright — the putative Warriors stopper — was getting worked by Danny Granger, and how badly Keith Smart was getting worked by the very underrated coach on the other bench. There was a moment when I thought Stephen Curry might have overcome the abominable way in which he is being used to be the hero of this game. But we know what happened there.

Continue reading

B Wright Stuffed: Warriors 90 Bulls 120

No sense in recapping this game, so I’m just going to use this space to exorcise a couple pet peeves.  Beginning with the biggest pet among my peeves, who goes by the name of Brandan Wright.

Continue reading

Opening Salvo: Golden State Warriors 132 Houston Rockets 128

I am a firm believer that there is nothing wrong with an ugly win.  That belief was tested a bit in this game, in which I was unable to discern many signs of cohesive team play on either side of the ball.  In my eyes, this game was won by the extraordinary individual efforts of a few very talented Warriors players.  I think you know who.  But it was a win.

Continue reading

First Look: LA Lakers 105 Golden State Warriors 102

“You are doing the defense a favor when you post up Lee or Biedrins.” —  Mark Jackson

I couldn’t agree with Mark Jackson more.  We were told by the commentators to last night’s game that Keith Smart and his staff were raving about David Lee’s “surprising” abilities in the low post. (Surprising to whom?  Matt Steinmetz et al? They weren’t surprising to feltbot.)  Jackson went on to explain that despite Lee’s talent in the post, he is one of the greatest pick and roll players in the league, and that is how the Warriors should deploy him. I couldn’t agree more, as readers of this blog know.

And yet last night we were treated by Keith Smart to four quarters of watching the Warriors trying to post up Lee and Biedrins in the heart of the Lakers defense.  Why?  For well over three quarters, Smart ran literally no pick and rolls with Lee that were designed to get him a shot.  Instead Andris Biedrins was used almost exclusively to set the high picks, with Lee standing uselessly on the wings waiting for the ball that never came. Why?

Continue reading

Golden State Warriors Snag Lou Amundson: First Take

In the surest sign to date that Don Nelson does not intend to play small this season, the Warriors just signed the 6-9″ 240 lb. Lou Amundson to a 2-year $5 million deal. There will be no more reliance on 20-year-old matchstick men to hold off the behemoths in the paint.  There will be no more courting of injury disasters such as befell the Warriors front-line last year, when both Brandon Wright and Anthony Randolph disappeared for the season.  There will be no more Corey Maggette at power forward. The Warriors are going to play big this season, even when they go to the bench.

And they are going to play with veterans. High basketball IQ veterans.

Amen.

Continue reading

How Do I Love Lee?

Let me count the ways. — E. B. Browning

Don Nelson, Larry Riley and the Golden State Warriors have just pulled off a trade for an all-star power forward, a trade that will define the next era of Warriors’ basketball.  And in the fashion typical of our wonderful Bay Area media, it was greeted by yawns and derision.  Some of these esteemed commentators, and their bellowing herds of followers, even arrived at the conclusion that the Warriors LOST this trade.  In their minds, because it was executed by the “old regime,” without the approval of the new owners, then it can’t be good.  And because Anthony Randolph is merely 21, while David Lee is all of 27, then Randolph automatically has a bigger upside than the all-star Lee.

Continue reading

Two Wrights and a Roster

Doesn’t look like I’m going to be able to post on the Lee trade until after the tournament; apologies to those who have been checking back for it.  I just have too much to do on my days off here: friends to catch up with, summer league games to catch.  And of course, the matter of returning my focus to where it’s needed most.  Several posts on the Warriors moves are coming soon, though, I promise.  I have too much to say to dog it. Continue reading

Did Don Nelson get the player he wanted?

Don’t answer until you check out this profile of Udoh.  I note several characteristics of a quintessential Don Nelson player.  First of all, “he has an incredible basketball intelligence.” Secondly, he has a love of doing the dirty work, which is something Nellie desperately wants from his four, and which has been sadly lacking in both Brandan Wright and Anthony Randolph.  Third, he has versatility, or as Nellie puts it, the ability to do more than one thing well.

Continue reading